Personal Independence Payment claims

We hope that our MD members are aware of the new PIP benefit that is replacing DLA, but in case they underestimate the process and qualifying rules they should start to prepare themselves as soon as possible. Peter Carrington has kindly written the following notes to help all members entitled to PIP to claim with as few problems as possible. It is important that our members start to plan for these payments before the paperwork lands on their doorstep. Anyone who is unable to deal with the application can always seek the help of Citizens Advice Bureau but it's likely that they are going to be really busy so, once again, dealing with it as soon as possible will help. Peter's volunteer work with hospital patients has shown that the more an applicant prepares for PIP the better their chances of qualifying.

The Benefits and Work advice site is excellent, though a complete set of their guides (July 2015 edition), including everything you need to know about applying for PIP, costs about 20.

Applicants have to apply for part 1 of PIP (basic personal details, name of GP, national insurance number, banking information and nature of disability) over the phone and then complete part 2 (how your disability affects you), which is sent by post, all within one month!! This means many applicants rush completing part 2 or don't have time to get help completing the forms.

We strongly suggest that our members obtain a copy of the new PIP part 2 forms and start formulating and drafting how they will answer each question with the following rules in mind:
Guidance issued by the DWP states that you need to be able to complete an activity ‘reliably’ in order for it to apply. According to the guidance, ‘reliably’ means whether you can do so:

  • Safely -- in a fashion that is unlikely to cause harm to yourself or to someone else;
  • To a necessary and appropriate standard, given the nature of the activity;
  • Repeatedly -- as often as is reasonably required;
  • In a timely manner -- in a reasonable amount of time.

    The new ‘descriptors’ are:

    Daily living activities

    The decision about whether you are entitled to the daily living component, and if so at what rate, is based on the number of points you score in total for the following activities:
  • 1. Preparing food
  • 2. Taking nutrition
  • 3. Managing therapy or monitoring a health condition
  • 4. Washing and bathing
  • 5. Managing toilet needs or incontinence
  • 6. Dressing and undressing
  • 7. Communicating verbally
  • 8. Reading and understanding signs, symbols and words
  • 9. Engaging with other people face to face
  • 10. Making budgeting decisions

    Mobility activities

    The decision about whether you are entitled to the mobility component, and if so at what rate, is based on the number of points you score in total for the following activities:
  • 1. Planning and following journeys
  • 2. Moving around

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